PMS Intro

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Freedom From Premenstrual Syndrome
Comprehensive, Natural Approach

 Overview

All menstruating women will experience some symptoms of Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) at some time. Often the sensations are very mild and not bothersome. For a large number of women the symptoms can be debilitating. The physical, emotional, and mental changes are the result of hormonal and biochemical fluctuations which normally occur at this stage in the menstrual cycle and how the nervous system responds to those changes. Why is one woman’s experience insignificant and another’s devastating?

All living organisms have many ways to adapt to the stresses imposed upon them by their environment. In normal times when stress is moderate, these adaptive mechanisms can maintain a relatively healthy state. Add too much stress from the environment, and it can overtax the organism, bringing our symptoms and illness. Or if the internal physiological or psychological mechanisms are too damaged, weak, or ineffective, even normal amounts of stress and environmental changes cannot be tolerated without a breakdown.

Brain neurotransmitter and hormones are intimately involved in PMS. They are very potent modifiers of biochemistry. Any abnormal fluctuation in brain neurotransmitters or hormone levels can cause dramatic and erratic alterations in physiology. One is particularly vulnerable when external stresses or underlying nutritional deficiencies intensify neurotransmitter and hormonal imbalances. Actually, new research seems to point towards how the brain reacts to biochemical changes as a stronger modifier of symptoms than the hormonal fluctuations themselves.

So one of the wisest ways for a woman to pursue natural health enhancement is to understand some of the powerful sources of stress that distort body and brain biochemical balance.

If we look at the Causes for Premenstrual Syndrome, we see a number of important causative factors:

  • nutrient imbalances
  • toxic contamination and immunological insult
  • spinal nerve irritation
  • poor physical conditioning
  • psycho-social stress
  • altered biological rhythms

The more of these that adversely affect a woman, the greater is the likelihood that more significant symptoms will be present. Some women may be affected only by a few. In other women, all might be powerfully at work. Note that severe endometriosis can have such an influential, adverse effect on PMS that on occasions the recommendations in these lessons (though not harmful to the condition of endometriosis) may not be able to satisfactorily overcome this element. Special procedures and care needs to be taken in these circumstances.

The rest of the lessons will use approaches which can free you from these premenstrual symptoms.